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Proceedings of the International Academy of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, 2024, 14(2): 48-59
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Article

Phenetic relationships among selected synanthropic beetles inferred from morphometric analysis

Ernel D. Bagbag1,2, Cesar G. Demayo2,3, Mark Anthony J. Torres3,4
1Natural Sciences Department, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Southeastern Philippines, Barrio Obrero, Davao City, Philippines
2Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Mathematics, Mindanao State University-Iligan Institute of Technology, Tibanga, Iligan City, Philippines
3Center of Integrative Health, Premier Research Institute of Science and Mathematics, Mindanao State University-Iligan Institute of Technology, Tibanga, Iligan City, Philippines
4School of Interdisciplinary Studies, Mindanao State University-Iligan Institute of Technology, Tibanga, Iligan City, Philippines

Received 8 March 2024;Accepted 25 March 2024;Published online 30 March 2024;Published 1 June 2024
IAEES

Abstract
Changes in the size of insect morphology, notably in beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera), may come from disturbances happening in anthropogenic contexts. Beetles living in anthropogenic situations may evolve similar sizes in their physical characteristics, which can lead to systematic discrepancy. This study examined how synanthropic beetles' morphometric characteristics varied within and between species. The present investigation collected 149 individual beetles from 18 families, and 11 morphological parameters were measured. Adonis and Similarity Percentage (SIMPER) analyses were performed after an NMDS (non-metric multidimensional scaling) plot was created to evaluate the similarities between various groups. The length of the body, elytra, antennae, and pronotum width were the most distinctive characteristics among beetles, which all share similar shorter character attributes. This work provides insights into the morphometrics of synanthropic beetle species in Mindanao, Philippines. The findings not only corroborate prior studies but also emphasize how the environment may influences the size and adaptability of beetles.

Keywords anthropogenic;Coleopterans;sisparity;morphometry;Philippines.



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